Twitter Porn Names Scam

What’s your #twitterpornname? To find out hook together the name of your first pet + the first part of the street you grew up on. Mine would probably be Bunsen Lynx, which doesn’t sound half bad for a scientwist. That said, raimalarter deflated my ego a little by telling me that name reminded her of The Muppets character. Thankfully Bunsen Lynx is not my genuine porn name, read on to find out why it’s probably not a good idea to reveal your real porn name in public.

It’s not an original idea (Sciencebase ran a post about a similar game in August 2005; and wasn’t the first), it used to be pet and mother’s unmarried name or something similar. It’s almost funny, sometimes. However, it always struck me as a bit of social engineering to get hold of people’s hidden keyphrases that are usually associated with their bank accounts.

Indeed, now that the phrase “twitter porn names” is doing the rounds I mentioned this on Twitter and several people agreed with me. After all, what are the secret questions that most logins ask you to store? Name of first pet, Street address, mother’s maiden name. You see where I’m coming from?

wav4rm certainly agreed that it could be a scam, and suggested that even if it weren’t devised as one, it could still be easily used as one after the fact. It’s a convoluted scam, but anyone looking for ways other than bruteforce password cracking will use any social engineering tricks at their disposal to find weak points in your online security.

So, if you told the whole twitterverse the name of your first pet, and where you were born using twitterpornnames, now is the time to amend your login details, choose a tougher password, and switch to the name of your second pet as your security question instead.

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